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Relevant Implications (Definitions)

Accessibility

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Accessibility is about making your outcome[1] work for a range[2] of people with different needs and/or disabilities.

One example is that in video games giving people the option to be able to remap their controls to better suit how they prefer to play. This is good for the stereotypical person but incredibly beneficial for people with a disability who might have difficulty pressing or reaching certain buttons.

Accessibility can also link into how the outcome works on different devices (if this is relevant). For example a website should work on mobile and a desktop. However a console videogame would only need[3] to work on a large screen.

Questions that you should consider are:

  • Can anyone access it on any device?
  • How will people access my outcome?
  • Is it accessible for people with physical disabilities?
  • Is it accessible for people with a range of different needs?
    • dyslexia
    • dyspraxia
    • colourblindness (look at different types)
    • autism
    • impaired vision
    • impaired hearing
    • limited motor control[4]
Terms definitions
2. range. A selection of items. When asked in the context[7] of an achievement standard it means at least three. In spreadsheets range is a way of selecting a group of cells. A colon is used to separate the starting and ending cells. e.g. B4:F10
3. need. An identified requirement of a person, group, or environment[6]. A need is identified from an issue[8] and sits within a context. Technological practice[5] can be undertaken in an attempt to meet an identified need.
4. control. How a computer system[9] operates or is “controlled”
Terms definitions
1. outcome. Accessibility is about making your outcome work for a range of people with different needs and/or disabilities. One example is that in video games giving people the option to be able to remap their controls to better suit how they prefer to play. This is good for the stereotypical person but incredibly beneficial for people […]
2. range. Accessibility is about making your outcome work for a range of people with different needs and/or disabilities. One example is that in video games giving people the option to be able to remap their controls to better suit how they prefer to play. This is good for the stereotypical person but incredibly beneficial for people […]
3. need. Accessibility is about making your outcome work for a range of people with different needs and/or disabilities. One example is that in video games giving people the option to be able to remap their controls to better suit how they prefer to play. This is good for the stereotypical person but incredibly beneficial for people […]
4. control. Accessibility is about making your outcome work for a range of people with different needs and/or disabilities. One example is that in video games giving people the option to be able to remap their controls to better suit how they prefer to play. This is good for the stereotypical person but incredibly beneficial for people […]
5. Technological practice. Accessibility is about making your outcome work for a range of people with different needs and/or disabilities. One example is that in video games giving people the option to be able to remap their controls to better suit how they prefer to play. This is good for the stereotypical person but incredibly beneficial for people […]